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Ælberht (d. 779/80), archbishop of York, was the teacher of Alcuin, whose Versus de patribus regibus et sanctis Euboricensis ecclesiae ('Verses on the Fathers, Kings and Saints of the Church of York') constitute the principal source for his career (Alcuin...

Article

Ælfheah [St Ælfheah, Elphege, Alphege] (d. 1012), archbishop of Canterbury, owes his fame to the circumstances of his death—he was murdered in 1012 at viking hands. This makes it difficult to know whether recorded details of his early life were invented to suit later hagiographic needs or whether they are in fact accurate. As abbot of ...

Article

William Hunt

revised by Marios Costambeys

Ælfric [Ælfric Puttoc] (d. 1051), archbishop of York, first appears as provost of New Minster, Winchester. He was consecrated to the see of York in 1023 by Archbishop Æthelnoth of Canterbury. Ælfric was a benefactor to the secular canons of Beverley, and translated the body of ...

Article

Ælfric (d. 1005), archbishop of Canterbury, was perhaps a monk of Abingdon in his earlier years. He is recorded in its chronicle as abbot, although the abbatial lists do not leave room for him. The statement that he was abbot receives corroboration from the fact that the magnate ...

Article

Ælfsige (d. 959), archbishop of Canterbury, was appointed bishop of Winchester in 951. From that date he regularly witnessed charters of kings Eadred and Eadwig, his name appearing at the head of the attesting bishops, until 958 when he was translated to Canterbury...

Article

William Hunt

revised by Marios Costambeys

Ælric (fl. 1050–1051), archbishop-elect of Canterbury, was probably a kinsman of Earl Godwine and had been brought up in the monastery of Christ Church at Canterbury from early youth. The only reliable information about him appears in the earliest life of Edward the Confessor...

Article

William Hunt

revised by Mary Frances Smith

Æthelgar (d. 990), archbishop of Canterbury, was a monk of Glastonbury under Dunstan (later archbishop of Canterbury) and of Abingdon under Æthelwold (later bishop of Winchester). In 964 Bishop Æthelwold expelled the secular clergy from New Minster, Winchester, in favour of monks and he appointed ...

Article

Æthelheard [Ethelhard] (d. 805), archbishop of Canterbury, was abbot of Louth in Lindsey before his elevation to the archbishopric of Canterbury on the death of Jænberht on 12 August 792. Nothing is known of his antecedents, but he can be assumed to be of Mercian extraction. He certainly owed his appointment to ...

Article

Æthelnoth (d. 1038), archbishop of Canterbury, was a son of Æthelmær, ealdorman of the western shires, and grandson of Ealdorman Æthelweard, the chronicler. A Glastonbury story relates that, at his baptism by Dunstan, the infant held up his hand in the manner of a bishop blessing the people, whereupon ...

Article

Æthelred (d. 888), archbishop of Canterbury, was archbishop from 870 until his death on 30 June 888, during the height of the viking wars. The statement in the F version of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle that he was the bishop of Wiltshire before his translation to ...