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Badby, John (d. 1410), Lollard heretic, was a craftsman (possibly a tailor or smith) of the diocese of Worcester, who achieved notoriety by his uninhibited denial of the doctrine of transubstantiation. Charged before his bishop, Thomas Peverell, on 2 January 1409, Badby insisted that the bread in the eucharist was not, and could not be, miraculously transformed into ...

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Cameron, Una May (1904–1987), mountaineer, was born at Rutherford House, West Linton, Peeblesshire, Scotland, on 6 May 1904, one of twin girls, the daughter of Ewen Cameron, landed proprietor, and his wife, Jeanie Dewar. The family was Scottish by descent, and its fortune was based on whisky. In adulthood this wealth enabled ...

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Cheyne, Sir John (c. 1390–1468), Lollard and rebel, was the elder son of Roger Cheyne (1362–1414) of Drayton Beauchamp, Buckinghamshire, one of the leaders of the Lollard movement in the early fifteenth century. Roger may well have adopted his heretical leanings through the influence of the prominent Lollard knight and diplomat ...

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Cheyne, Sir John (d. 1414), diplomat, heretic, and speaker-elect of the House of Commons, of unknown parentage, was a scion of the family of Cheyne of Drayton Beauchamp, Buckinghamshire. Almost certainly a younger son, he was probably intended for a career in the church. ...

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Clanvow, Sir John (c. 1341–1391), courtier and poet, was probably the son and heir of John Clanvow, a minor landowner in the Welsh borders. In his early years John the younger saw active service abroad. In 1364 he fought in Brittany, and he was with ...

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Christina von Nolcken

Claydon, John (d. 1415), heretic, is first certainly recorded on 9 June 1386, when with five others he stood surety for John Northampton, formerly a controversial mayor of London, and for Northampton's associates John More and Richard Norbury. He may also have been the ...

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Fulkherd, Quentin [Quintin Folkhard] (fl. 1407–1410), alleged Lollard heretic, is identified only in two English safe conducts from 1407, as 'Quintin Folkhard of Scotland', and in a batch of his letters dated 1410 and entitled Nova Scocie, which are preserved in a ...

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Latimer, Sir Thomas (1341–1401), soldier and alleged heretic, was the third son of Sir Warin Latimer of Braybrooke, Northamptonshire, and Katherine, daughter of John de la Warr, born between 10 and 17 September 1341. He is chiefly notable as the most conspicuous, if not the most fervent, member of a group of courtiers and soldiers disparaged by the chroniclers ...

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Neville, Sir William (c. 1341–1391), Lollard, was the fifth son of Ralph Neville, fourth Lord Neville (c. 1291–1367), of Raby, and his wife, Alice (c.1300–1374), daughter of Hugh, Lord Audley; he was the younger brother of John Neville, fifth Baron Neville...

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Oldcastle, John, Baron Cobham (d. 1417), soldier, heretic, and rebel, came from a Herefordshire family that emerged in the fourteenth century.

Oldcastle's great-grandfather Peter is the earliest recorded member of his family, and his grandfather, another John, represented the shire in parliament in 1368 and 1372. His father, ...