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Heke Pokai, Hone Wiremu (c. 1807/8–1850), Maori war leader, was born at Pakaraka, inland from the Bay of Islands in the North Island of New Zealand. His birth probably took place shortly after the great battle between his people and Ngati Whatua, often known as ...

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Hone Wiremu Heke Pokai (c. 1807/88–1850) by Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins, pubd 1847 (after George French Angas) [left, with Eruera Maihi Patuone] Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand, Te Puna Matauranga o Aotearoa (PUBL-0014-44)

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Hongi Hika (1772–1828), Maori tribal leader and war chief, was, by his own account, born in the year of the death of the French explorer Marion du Fresne, 1772, near Kaikohe in central Northland in the North Island of New Zealand. He was the second of several children of ...

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Hongi Hika (1772–1828) by unknown artist, c. 1820 [centre, with Waikato (left) and the missionary Thomas Kendall (right)] Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand, Te Puna Matauranga o Aotearoa (G-618)

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Makoni, Mutota (c. 1835–1896), anti-colonial warrior, is believed to have been born in the Maungwe region, later overlapping with the Makoni district, some 50 miles north-west of Mutare in Mashonaland. Centred on a succession of stone-built villages, whose complex fortifications impressed the British hunter ...

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Mapondera, Kadungure (1840s–1904), warrior chief in Africa, was born at Nyota, a mountain stronghold of the Negomo dynasty, in what is now northern Mashonaland, Zimbabwe. Mapondera's mother, Mwera, was a mhondwa, a slave wife, but there is no agreement as to who his father was. Some accounts favour ...

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Moorosi [Morosi] (c. 1795–1879), ruler of the Ngwe (Putili) and warrior, was born, oral evidence suggests, at Mohale's Hoek in the south of what became Lesotho. His father, Mokuoane, Ngwe (Putili) ruler, became a vassal of the Sotho leader Moshoeshoe in the late 1820s. When ...

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Ne Win (1911–2002), military ruler of Burma, was born Shu Maung on 14 May 1911 in Paungdale, central Burma, the son of Po Kha, a revenue surveyor, and his wife, Mi Le. His father's home was said to be a frequent stop for touring nationalist politicians despite his employment by the British colonial government. Having attended ...

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Ne Win (1911–2002) by unknown photographer, 1958 Getty Images

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Pemulwoy (c. 1760–1802), Aboriginal warrior, was a member of the Bediagal band of the Dharug people, whose lands occupied the head of Botany Bay, 6 miles south of the Port Jackson convict settlement.

Within months of the first fleet's arrival in January 1788 wary Dharug–British relations degenerated into avoidance and violence. A thousand newcomers, equal to their own number, rent the Dharug's world. Competition for resources eased only momentarily in April 1789, when smallpox killed half the Dharug. On 10 December 1790 ...