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Lindow Man (fl. 1st cent.?), victim of ritual sacrifice, colloquially named Pete Marsh or the Body in the Bog, was found in Lindow Moss, near Wilmslow, Cheshire, in August 1984. A Celt, probably of the Brigantes tribe, he was a ritual sacrifice whose remains were deposited in a peat bog. The skin, hair, fingernails, bone collagen, and some internal organs had been preserved by the tannins of the sphagnum moss....

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Lindow Man (fl. 1st cent.?) by unknown photographer © The Trustees of the British Museum

Article

Red Lady of Paviland (fl. 33,000 bc ?), recipient of ceremonial burial, is not a historical character but an incomplete prehistoric human skeleton. The biography of the once living person can therefore only be recovered through the historical interpretations of the skeleton as a scientific object and of the context in which it was found. The remains were discovered in January 1823 by the ...

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Sutton Hoo burial (early 7th cent.), is named from the place where a king or aristocrat probably lay buried in the barrow known as mound 1. Sutton Hoo, in the extreme south-east of modern Suffolk, is situated on a high bluff on the left bank of the ...

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Sutton Hoo burial (early 7th cent.) parade helmet © Copyright The British Museum

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Worcester Pilgrim (fl. 1450s?), is the name given to the skeleton of a man, largely intact and partially clothed, which was discovered in 1987 during excavations at the base of the south-east pier of the crossing tower of Worcester Cathedral. The absence of a skull and of the right shoulder was caused by disturbances to the grave by building works in the cathedral in the centuries after the burial. An analysis of the remains and their associated grave goods has suggested that they constitute a rare example of a burial identifiable from its clothing as that of a pilgrim—the only other English one known being a twelfth- or thirteenth-century find in ...