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Ælfgar, earl of Mercia (d. 1062?), magnate, was the son of Leofric, earl of Mercia, and Godgifu (Godiva). He married, perhaps in the late 1020s, Ælfgifu, probably a kinswoman of Cnut's first wife, Ælfgifu of Northampton. Her known lands lay in the east midlands and ...

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Ann Williams

Ælfhere (d. 983), magnate, was the son of Ealhhelm, ealdorman of central Mercia (what is now Worcestershire and Gloucestershire) from 940 to 951. Ælfhere and his brothers are greeted as kinsmen by successive kings, though the degree of relationship is unknown. They were particularly close to ...

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See Ælfhere

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Ann Williams

Ælfric (d. 1016), magnate, must be distinguished from his contemporary Ælfric Cild [see under Ælfhere (d. 983)], who was ealdorman of Mercia from 983 to 985. In 982 he succeeded Ealdorman Æthelmær (977–82) in a command which included Hampshire (AS chart....

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Ælfstan of Boscombe (fl. 1043–1065), nobleman, is identified by Domesday Book as a substantial landholder, with an estate of some 237 hides of land, scattered over eight shires, making him the fifth richest of the recorded pre-conquest thegns below the rank of earl. Most of this land was probably his inheritance, but the charter whereby ...

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See kings of the Hwicce

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Æthelstan [Ethelstan, Æthelstan Half-King] (fl. 932–956), magnate, was the second of four sons of Ealdorman Æthelfrith, who ruled the southern and eastern territories of Mercia. Æthelfrith was descended from the West Saxon royal family and held extensive estates in Somerset and Devon. His wife, ...

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Æthelweard [Ethelwerd] (d. 998?), chronicler and magnate, was ealdorman of south-western England. He styled himself 'Patricius Consul Fabius Quaestor', a latinization of 'Æthel-/ealdorman/Fabius/-weard'. He was the father of Æthelmær, grandfather of one Æthelweard and grandfather-in-law of another: all also ealdormen, and two of the same south-western ealdormanry as ...

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Æthelwine [Ethelwine, Æthelwine Dei Amicus] (d. 992), magnate and founder of Ramsey Abbey, Huntingdonshire, was the fourth and youngest son of Æthelstan, known as the Half-King (932–956), and his wife, Ælfwyn (d. 986). He was a few years older than the atheling ...

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K. S. B. Keats-Rohan

Alan Rufus (d. 1093), magnate, was the second of at least seven legitimate sons of Count Eudo, regent of Brittany from 1040 to 1047, and Orguen, or Agnes, his Angevin wife. Alan was called Rufus (‘the Red’) to distinguish him from a younger brother, ...