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Abbo of Fleury [St Abbo of Fleury] (945x50–1004), abbot of St Benoît-sur-Loire, was a French monk influential, by both his presence in England and his writings, in the monastic revival of the late tenth century. He was born in the region of Orléans...

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Acca [St Acca] (d. 740), bishop of Hexham, is best known as the disciple of Wilfrid and patron of Bede. He became a monk at an unknown date and joined the household of Bishop Bosa of York after 678; but he seems to have attached himself to ...

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Adalbert [St Adalbert, Adalbert Levita] (supp. fl. early 8th cent.), missionary, is associated with Willibrord and venerated at Egmont, near Alkmaar in the Netherlands. He makes his earliest appearance in a life written between 978 and 993 by monks of the monastery of ...

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Adomnán [St Adomnán] (627/8?–704), abbot of Iona and writer, who became known to history as the ninth abbot of Iona and the outstanding Irish churchman of his day, was born of the royal line of Cenél Conaill, a dynasty which formed part of the over-kingdom of the northern ...

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Æbbe [St Æbbe, Ebba] (d. 683?), abbess of Coldingham, was the daughter of Acha, queen of Northumbria, and uterine sister of kings Oswald and Oswiu. According to late and unverifiable traditions preserved mainly in a life ascribed to the twelfth-century hagiographer Reginald of Durham...

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See Meath, saints of

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Áedán [St Áedán, Aidan] (d. 651), missionary and bishop, was an Irish monk of Iona. All that is known about him comes from Bede's Historia ecclesiastica, completed in 731. King Oswald of the Northumbrians (r. 634–42) converted to Christianity while in exile from ...

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Ælfflæd [St Ælfflæd, Elfleda] (654–714), abbess of Strensall–Whitby, was the daughter of Oswiu, king of Northumbria (d. 670), and his wife, Eanflæd. She was dedicated to religion when scarcely a year old, in fulfilment of a vow made by her father before his victory at the battle of the ...

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Ælfheah [St Ælfheah, Elphege, Alphege] (d. 1012), archbishop of Canterbury, owes his fame to the circumstances of his death—he was murdered in 1012 at viking hands. This makes it difficult to know whether recorded details of his early life were invented to suit later hagiographic needs or whether they are in fact accurate. As abbot of ...

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Æthelberht [St Æthelberht, Ethelbert] (779/80–794), king of the East Angles, was the son of King Æthelred of the East Angles and was executed in 794 by order of King Offa of Mercia, as a result of which he came to be regarded as a royal martyr. His cult, which probably started life as a focus for resistance to ...