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Áedán [St Áedán, Aidan] (d. 651), missionary and bishop, was an Irish monk of Iona. All that is known about him comes from Bede's Historia ecclesiastica, completed in 731. King Oswald of the Northumbrians (r. 634–42) converted to Christianity while in exile from ...

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Asaf [St Asaf, Asaph, Asa] (supp. fl. 6th cent.), bishop, is the patron of St Asaph and the nearby Llanasa in north-east Wales. According to late medieval and early modern Welsh saints' genealogies, he was the son of Sawyl Benuchel ap Pabo Post Prydain...

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Cedd [St Cedd] (d. 664), bishop of the East Saxons, was the eldest of four brothers who were Northumbrian and educated at Lindisfarne by Áedán and Finan. Cedd and the others, Ceadda, Cynebill, and Caelin, all became priests and Ceadda also a bishop. Nearly all that is known of them comes from ...

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Colmán [St Colmán] (d. 676), bishop of Lindisfarne, was an Irish monk from Iona. He may conceivably be the 'Colmanus abbas' recorded by the seventeenth-century scholar Patrick Young as the addressee of a charter, now lost, from Wulfhere, king of the Mercians...

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Felix [St Felix] (d. 647/8), bishop of the East Angles, was born in the Frankish kingdom of Burgundy. Like all that is known for certain about Felix, his origin is reported by Bede in his Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum and Bede says that he was ordained in ...

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Ninian [St Ninian] (supp. fl. 5th–6th cent.), missionary and bishop, is credited with building Candida Casa at Whithorn, in south-west Scotland, where he was buried. It is symptomatic of the paucity of firm information about his life that there should be entrenched scholarly disagreement even about when he lived. It was generally assumed, on inadequate evidence, that he flourished in the fifth century; but more recently it has been argued, from the same inadequate evidence, that he was active as late as the mid-sixth century. Another suggestion is that there were, in fact, two ...

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Paulinus [St Paulinus] (d. 644), bishop of York and of Rochester, was almost certainly an Italian by birth. He was one of the Roman monks sent by Pope Gregory the Great (r. 590–604) to England in 601 to support Augustine's mission. Gregory...

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C. R. Beazley

revised by Marios Costambeys

Romanus (d. in or before 627), bishop of Rochester, was probably among the missionaries sent with Augustine to Britain in 597 by Pope Gregory the Great [see also Gregorian mission]. In 624, on the death of Mellitus, Justus was moved to the metropolitan see of ...

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Waldhere [Wealdhere] (fl. 694–704/5), bishop of the East Saxons, often (later) called bishop of London, must have been appointed between 688, when Bishop Earconwald, named as an adviser in the law code of Ine (688–726), was still in office, and 694. In that year, ...