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Abel (fl. 744–747), bishop-suffragan of Rheims, first appears in the acts of the Council of Soissons in March 744, which record the elevation of himself and one Hartbert to the status of archbishops, although the acts mention no specific sees. Historians have considered these appointments as a restoration of the lapsed ancient Gallic provincial organization under the inspiration of ...

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Adam [Adam of Caithness] (d. 1222), abbot of Melrose and bishop of Caithness, is variously described as having been a foundling and as having originated in Cumberland. He was elected bishop on 5 August 1213 when he was abbot of Melrose, the third bishop to be appointed to ...

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Adam [Adam the Welshman] (c. 1130–1181), theologian and bishop of St Asaph, has on the authority of Du Boulay's Historia universitatis Parisiensis (1665), and of Thomas Tanner's Bibliotheca Britannico-Hibernica (1748), been confused with a fictitious Adam Angligena and, even in the most recent histories of the ...

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William Hunt

revised by Marios Costambeys

Ælfweard (d. 1044), abbot of Evesham and bishop of London, is said by the chronicle of Evesham to have been a relative of Cnut, presumably through Cnut's first, English, wife, Ælfgifu of Northampton. He was a monk of Ramsey and was made abbot of ...

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Ælfwine (d. 1047), bishop of Winchester, was formerly a royal priest in the service of King Cnut. According to Goscelin, Ælfwine helped Ælfstan, abbot of St Augustine's, Canterbury, to persuade Cnut to permit the relics of St Mildrith to be translated there. Ælfwine's...

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Æthelmaer (d. after 1070), bishop of Elmham, succeeded to that East Anglian see in 1047, the year when its former occupant, his brother Stigand, became archbishop of Canterbury. Such familial promotion, coupled with the fact that Æthelmaer was, or had been, married, makes him an easy target for anyone wanting to suggest that the late Anglo-Saxon church badly needed the kind of reforms implemented by the Normans under ...

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Æthelric (d. 1034), bishop of Dorchester, was a former monk of Ramsey and a generous patron of his monastery. His election to the see of Dorchester in 1016 perhaps owed something to his family connections, although these are unknown. Given the extent and geographical location of this large see, it was perhaps believed that a local man would prove to be the most effective bishop. During his early years at the monastic school in ...

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See Stigand

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Æthelwine (d. in or after 1071), bishop of Durham, was originally a monk of Peterborough Abbey along with his brother Æthelric. When Bishop Edmund (d. c.1050) of Durham returned from his consecration in the presence of King Cnut about 1020 he brought ...

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Æthelwold [St Æthelwold, Ethelwold] (904x9–984), abbot of Abingdon and bishop of Winchester, was a leading figure in the tenth-century church reform movement. He was born in Winchester to noble parents during the reign of Edward the Elder, probably between 904 and 909.

As a youth ...