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Abel (fl. 744–747), bishop-suffragan of Rheims, first appears in the acts of the Council of Soissons in March 744, which record the elevation of himself and one Hartbert to the status of archbishops, although the acts mention no specific sees. Historians have considered these appointments as a restoration of the lapsed ancient Gallic provincial organization under the inspiration of ...

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Thompson Cooper

revised by Rosemary Mitchell

Acton, Charles Januarius Edward (1803–1847), cardinal, was born at Naples on 6 March 1803, the second son of Sir John Francis Edward Acton, sixth baronet (1736–1811), of Aldenham Hall, near Bridgnorth, Shropshire. Sir John was commander-in-chief of the land and sea forces of the kingdom of ...

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Adam [Adam of Caithness] (d. 1222), abbot of Melrose and bishop of Caithness, is variously described as having been a foundling and as having originated in Cumberland. He was elected bishop on 5 August 1213 when he was abbot of Melrose, the third bishop to be appointed to ...

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Adam [Adam the Welshman] (c. 1130–1181), theologian and bishop of St Asaph, has on the authority of Du Boulay's Historia universitatis Parisiensis (1665), and of Thomas Tanner's Bibliotheca Britannico-Hibernica (1748), been confused with a fictitious Adam Angligena and, even in the most recent histories of the ...

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Adrian IV [real name Nicholas Breakspear] (d. 1159), pope, was the first and, so far, only Englishman to be elected pope. As such, a web of myth surrounds his origins, and no doubt much is later tradition woven at the great abbey of ...

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Ælberht (d. 779/80), archbishop of York, was the teacher of Alcuin, whose Versus de patribus regibus et sanctis Euboricensis ecclesiae ('Verses on the Fathers, Kings and Saints of the Church of York') constitute the principal source for his career (Alcuin...

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Ælfheah [St Ælfheah, Elphege, Alphege] (d. 1012), archbishop of Canterbury, owes his fame to the circumstances of his death—he was murdered in 1012 at viking hands. This makes it difficult to know whether recorded details of his early life were invented to suit later hagiographic needs or whether they are in fact accurate. As abbot of ...

Article

William Hunt

revised by Marios Costambeys

Ælfric [Ælfric Puttoc] (d. 1051), archbishop of York, first appears as provost of New Minster, Winchester. He was consecrated to the see of York in 1023 by Archbishop Æthelnoth of Canterbury. Ælfric was a benefactor to the secular canons of Beverley, and translated the body of ...

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Ælfric (d. 1005), archbishop of Canterbury, was perhaps a monk of Abingdon in his earlier years. He is recorded in its chronicle as abbot, although the abbatial lists do not leave room for him. The statement that he was abbot receives corroboration from the fact that the magnate ...

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Ælfsige (d. 959), archbishop of Canterbury, was appointed bishop of Winchester in 951. From that date he regularly witnessed charters of kings Eadred and Eadwig, his name appearing at the head of the attesting bishops, until 958 when he was translated to Canterbury...