1-15 of 15 results  for:

  • crimes of deception x
  • Christianity x
Clear all

Article

Backhouse, Sir Edmund Trelawny, second baronet (1873–1944), Sinologist and fraudster, eldest of the four surviving sons of Jonathan Edmund Backhouse, first baronet (1849–1918), a banker, and Florence (1845–1902), youngest daughter of Sir John Salusbury Salusbury-Trelawny, was born on 20 October 1873 at The Rookery, Middleton Tyas, Yorkshire...

Article

Bolron, Robert (fl. 1665–1682), informer and perjurer, was born in Newcastle upon Tyne. Apprenticed to a jeweller in London, he left after a year to become a foot soldier at Tynemouth Castle. During the Second Anglo-Dutch War (1665–7) he served on a frigate. In 1674 ...

Image

Robert Feilding (1650/5151–1712) by Jan van der Vaart, c.1678-79 (after Sir Peter Lely) © National Portrait Gallery, London

Article

Feilding, Robert (1650/51–1712), rake and bigamist, was born at Solihull, Warwickshire, the son of George Feilding, landowner, a kinsman of the earl of Denbigh. Nothing is known about his mother. He was admitted to the Middle Temple in 1673, but upon inheriting £600...

Article

Sidney Lee

revised by M. J. Mercer

Gahagan, Usher (d. 1749), classical scholar and coiner, came from a family in co. Westmeath, Ireland, but nothing more is known about his background or early life. He attended Trinity College, Dublin, with the intention of entering the law but his conversion to Catholicism while a student prevented him from being called to the bar. He left without taking a degree and was disowned by his parents. He married a wealthy heiress, whom he treated cruelly, and they soon separated. His conduct alienated his remaining friends, and with mounting debts he moved to ...

Article

La Cloche, Jacques de (1644/1647?–1669), pretended son of Charles II, may have come from Jersey, but nothing is known of his early life or true parentage. He claimed to be the son of Charles II (1630–1685) and he named a woman in his will as '...

Article

Lightowller, Thomas (fl. 1741–1769), coiner, was the eldest son of Thomas Lightowller, joiner, and his wife, Mary, of Walton-le-Dale, near Preston, Lancashire. His date and place of birth are uncertain but the parish registers of Walton-le-Dale record the marriage of his parents in 1721 and the baptism of their second son, ...

Article

Prance, Miles (fl. 1678–1688), perjurer, was born in Eastwood in the Isle of Ely. His father was Simon Prance, gentleman, a Roman Catholic convert of royalist sympathies. In his youth Miles Prance was apprenticed to a gold- and silversmith and in the early 1670s he was a servant-in-ordinary to ...

Article

Sadleir, John (1813–1856), politician and swindler, was born on 17 November 1813 at Shronell House in the parish of Shronell, co. Tipperary. He was the fifth of seven children of Clement William Sadleir, farmer and middleman, reputedly descended from Henry Sadeleyer of Hackney...

Image

John Sadleir (1813–1856) by unknown engraver courtesy of the National Library of Ireland

Article

Savundra, Emil [formerly Marion Emil Anacletus Pierre Savundranayagam] (1923–1976), swindler, was born on 6 July 1923 in Ceylon. His father was stated to have been a Ceylonese judge. He attended school in Ceylon, and although he never attended university, he gained a doctorate of civil law from the ...

Image

Emil Savundra (1923–1976) by unknown photographer © News International Newspapers Ltd

Article

Simnel, Lambert (b. 1476/7, d. after 1534), impostor and claimant to the English throne, was born probably in Oxford, the son of Thomas Simnel, a carpenter, organ maker, or cobbler. His origins are obscure, even in official accounts; his mother is unknown and he may have been illegitimate. Nothing is known of his upbringing....

Article

Warbeck, Perkin [Pierrechon de Werbecque; alias Richard Plantagenet, duke of York] (c. 1474–1499), impostor and claimant to the English throne, was, according to the confession he made in 1497, born at Tournai in France, the son of John Osbek, comptroller of the town of ...

Article

Wilford [Wulford], Ralph (c. 1479–1499), impostor and claimant to the English throne, was the son of a cordwainer who lived at the Black Bull in Bishopsgate Street, London. He was encouraged by an Augustinian friar named Patrick to challenge Henry VII's possession of the throne by impersonating the imprisoned ...