1-5 of 5 results  for:

  • patron saint x
  • Christianity x
Clear all

Article

Andrew [St Andrew] (fl. 1st cent.), apostle and patron saint of Scotland, was a fisherman from Capernaum in Galilee.

In the synoptic gospels Andrew is merely mentioned as one of the twelve disciples of Jesus, but in the gospel of St John he appears as a follower of ...

Article

David [St David, Dewi] (d. 589/601), patron saint of Wales and founder of St David's, is known from written sources dating from no earlier than the eighth century and an inscription which may be of the seventh.

By the ninth century David's cult was sufficiently well established for him to be one of three Welsh saints included in the early ninth-century Irish martyrology of ...

Article

George [St George] (d. c. 303?), patron saint of England, is a figure whose historicity cannot be established with certainty. However, an inscription at Shaqqa in the Hauran, in the south-west of present-day Syria, which commemorates 'the holy and triumphant martyrs, George and the saints who [suffered martyrdom] with him' (...

Article

Magnús Erlendsson, earl of Orkney [St Magnus] (1075/6–1116?), patron saint of Orkney, was the son of Erlend Thorfinnsson, earl of Orkney [see under Paul (d. 1098/)], and Thora, daughter of Sumerlidi Ospaksson of Iceland, whose union is the first evidence for close connections between ...

Article

Patrick [St Patrick, Pádraig] (fl. 5th cent.), patron saint of Ireland, was the son of a deacon named Calpornius. Patrick was a Romano-Briton by birth, but subsequently became honoured as apostle to the Irish and Ireland's patron saint.

Patrick is known primarily from two works of his which have survived, both of them written in ...