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Philip Thomas Byard Clayton (1885–1972) by Howard Coster, 1937 © National Portrait Gallery, London

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Clayton, Philip Thomas Byard [Tubby] (1885–1972), Church of England clergyman and founder of the Toc H movement, was born on 12 December 1885 at Maryborough, Queensland, Australia, the third son and sixth and youngest child of Reginald Byard Buchanan Clayton, manager of a sugar plantation, and his wife, who was also his first cousin, ...

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Hopkins, Charles Plomer (1861–1922), founder of missions to seamen and trade unionist, was born on 7 March 1861 in Brewster, Massachusetts, USA, the son of an American master mariner employed for many years as a river pilot in Burma, and an English mother, ...

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Mather, Ebenezer Joseph (1849–1927), founder of the Royal National Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen, was born on 12 June 1849 at Foregate Street, Stafford, the son of Henry Penkett Mather (c.1805–1886), a shoe manufacturer, and his wife, Elizabeth, née Douthwaite. Although raised a member of the ...

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Palmer, James (bap. 1581, d. 1660), Church of England clergyman and benefactor, was born in the parish of St Margaret's Westminster, and baptized there in July 1581, the son of Henry Palmer. He graduated BA of Magdalene College, Cambridge, early in 1602 and proceeded MA in 1605; while there he received an exhibition from the ...

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Stephenson, Thomas Bowman (1839–1912), Wesleyan Methodist minister and founder of the National Children's Home and Orphanage, London, was born at Newcastle upon Tyne on 22 December 1839, the sixth child of John Stephenson, Wesleyan Methodist minister, and his wife, Mary (née Bowman)...

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(Edward) Chad Varah (1911–2007) by Lucinda Douglas-Menzies, 1988 © Lucinda Douglas-Menzies / National Portrait Gallery, London

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Varah, (Edward) Chad (1911–2007), Church of England clergyman and founder of the Samaritans, was born on 12 November 1911 at the vicarage, Barton upon Humber, Lincolnshire, the eldest son and eldest of nine children of Canon William Edward Varah (1862–1945), a strict Tractarian and vicar of ...

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Williams, David (1738–1816), political and religious theorist and founder of the Literary Fund, the son of William David (d. 1752), was born at Waunwaelod, near Watford, on the north slope of Caerphilly Mountain in the parish of Eglwysilan, Glamorgan, south Wales, and baptized there on 9 December 1738. His father invested his money in a shop supplying tools to mining works, but the venture ultimately failed. Three of his brothers 'just entering into life died of a consumption, the malady of the family' (...

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David Williams (1738–1816) by Thornthwaite (after John Francis Rigaud, exh. RA 1774) © National Portrait Gallery, London

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Wilson, William Carus (1791–1859), Church of England clergyman and founder of charity schools, was born on 7 July 1791 at Heversham, Westmorland, the eldest of the eight surviving children of William Carus (1764–1851) of Casterton Hall, Westmorland, and his wife, Margaret (d...