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Æthelberht [St Æthelberht, Ethelbert] (779/80–794), king of the East Angles, was the son of King Æthelred of the East Angles and was executed in 794 by order of King Offa of Mercia, as a result of which he came to be regarded as a royal martyr. His cult, which probably started life as a focus for resistance to ...

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Æthelberht (779/8080–794) coin © Copyright The British Museum

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Alfred [Ælfred] (848/9–899), king of the West Saxons and of the Anglo-Saxons, was born at Wantage. He was the youngest of at least six children of King Æthelwulf of Wessex (d. 858) and of Osburh, daughter of Oslac, the king's butler (said to be descended from the family that founded the kingdom of the ...

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Alfred (848/99–899) silver penny, 871–99 © Copyright The British Museum

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Ceolwulf [St Ceolwulf] (d. 764), king of Northumbria, was a descendant of Ida, who had founded the kingdom of Bernicia (the northern part of Northumbria) in 547; but, whereas until 716 the only members of Ida's family to have reigned in Northumbria...

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Cormac mac Cuilennáin (d. 908), king of Munster and bishop, belonged to one of the lesser branches of the Éoganacht and his assumption of the kingship of Munster seems likely to have been a compromise arrangement (Byrne, 214, 292). It is likely that his marriage to ...

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Eadwine [St Eadwine, Edwin] (c. 586–633), king of Northumbria, was the son of Ælla, king of Deira, and the fifth of the seven overkings named by Bede. His life, as recorded in vivid and detailed anecdotes by both Bede and the author of the ...

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Ealhmund [St Ealhmund] (d. 800), prince and martyr, is the subject of a passio (account of martyrdom) preserved only in the fourteenth-century manuscript in the Gotha Forschungsbibliothek (MS I.81). This text, which is utterly unreliable, presents him as the son of Aldfrith, king of Northumbria...

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Edmund [St Edmund] (d. 869), king of the East Angles, was venerated as a saint soon after his death at the hands of vikings. According to numismatic evidence, Edmund succeeded King Æthelweard. The number of coins issued in Edmund's name indicates that he reigned for several years, but the only fact known about him from contemporary writings is in the ...

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Gwynllyw [St Gwynllyw, Woolloos] (fl. 6th cent.), king of Glywysing, became, after a religious conversion, patron saint and founder of St Woolloos, Newport. His vita, probably of the early twelfth century, has a triple function: first, it sets out a model of the good king; second, it is a story of a conversion from worldly power and riches to monastic asceticism, so written as to proclaim the saintly status both of ...

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Oswald [St Oswald] (603/4–642), king of Northumbria, was the second son of Æthelfrith (d. c. 616), king of Bernicia and later of the Northumbrians, and his wife, Acha, the daughter of Ælla, king of Deira.

Following Æthelfrith's death in battle against Acha's brother ...

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Oswine [St Oswine, Oswin] (d. 651), king of Deira, was the last independent ruler of Deira, the southern part of Northumbria. His father was the apostate Osric (d. 634), but Oswine is portrayed by Bede as a model of royal submission to the authority of the church. Following his father's overthrow in 634 he is said to have been taken to ...

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See Harald Maddadson [Haraldr Maddaðarson], earl of Caithness and earl of Orkney

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See kings of the East Saxons

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See kings of the East Saxons