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Article

Alexander Gordon

revised by M. J. Mercer

Addington, Stephen (1729–1796), Independent minister and tutor, was born at Northampton on 9 June 1729, the seventh son of Samuel Addington, who was either a hatter or a glover, and his wife, Mary. He was a student at Philip Doddridge's academy at Northampton...

Article

A. B. Grosart

revised by M. J. Mercer

Aldridge, William (1737–1797), Independent minister, was born at Warminster, in Wiltshire. He spent his youth in the pursuit of pleasure, but in his twenties he was affected by a passionate desire to be a preacher of the gospel. He joined the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion...

Article

Alexander Gordon

revised by David Huddleston

Alexander, William Lindsay (1808–1884), Congregational minister, eldest son of William Alexander (1781–1866), wine merchant, and his wife, Elizabeth Lindsay (d. 1848), was born at Leith on 24 August 1808. Having attended Leith high school and a boarding-school at East Linton, he entered ...

Article

Allen, John (c. 1596–1671), minister in America, was born to unknown parents. He matriculated as a pensioner at Christ's College, Cambridge, in July 1613, graduating BA in 1617 and proceeding MA in 1620 (not, as Venn says, from Gonville and Caius College). He was ordained priest at ...

Image

Henry Allon (1818–1892) by Lock & Whitfield, pubd 1879 © National Portrait Gallery, London

Article

Allon, Henry (1818–1892), Congregational minister and leader, was born at Welton, near Hull, on 13 October 1818, the son of William Allon (d. 1878), a builder and later estate steward, and Mary Allon. He followed his father in apprenticeship to a builder in ...

Article

Thompson Cooper

revised by M. J. Mercer

Angus, John (1724–1801), Independent minister, was born on 24 July 1724 at Styford, near Hexham, Northumberland. In 1741 he entered Edinburgh University, where he remained for two years, before moving to London in 1743 to begin a course of ministerial training under John Eames...

Article

Armitage, Timothy (d. 1655), Independent minister, matriculated in Michaelmas term 1633 as a sizar from St Catharine's College, Cambridge. He graduated BA in 1637 and proceeded MA in 1640. From early November 1643 he acted as curate of St Michael Coslany, Norwich, Norfolk...

Article

A. B. Grosart

revised by Jim Benedict

Ashwood, John (1657–1706), Independent minister, the only son of Bartholomew Ashwood (1622–1678), was born in Axminster, Devon, where his father was vicar. His mother may have been Elizabeth (d. 1710), the wife who outlived Bartholomew. After a 'remarkable' conversion at the age of fourteen, he was admitted to his father's Independent church at ...

Article

A. B. Grosart

revised by M. J. Mercer

Asty, John (1675–1730), Independent minister, the second son of Robert Asty (1642–1681), Independent minister at Norwich, and his wife, Lydia (d. 1697), eldest daughter of the Revd John Sammes of Coggeshall, Essex, was born at Norwich on 12 September 1675 and baptized at the ...

Article

Aveling, Thomas William Baxter (1815–1884), Congregational minister, was born on 11 May 1815 at Castletown in the Isle of Man, the son of a soldier and an Irish mother. He received his theological training at Highbury College from 1834, and in 1838 was appointed to the pastorate of the ...

Article

Bagshaw, Edward (1629/30–1671), Independent minister and religious controversialist, was born at Broughton, Northamptonshire, the son of Edward Bagshaw (d. 1662). After education at Westminster School, on 1 May 1646 he was elected to a studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he matriculated on 1 February 1647, aged seventeen. He graduated BA in 1649 and MA in 1651 (incorporated at ...

Article

Barker, Matthew (1619–1698), Independent minister, was born in Cransley, Northamptonshire, of unknown parents. He was groomed for the ministry from an early age and matriculated from Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1634, graduating BA in 1638 and proceeding MA in 1641. Upon leaving university ...

Article

J. M. Rigg

revised by J. M. V. Quinn

Barker, Thomas Richard (1799–1870), Congregational minister, born in London on 30 November 1799, was educated at Christ's Hospital (1807–16); he hoped to go on to Cambridge and to be ordained in the Church of England, but his parents, who were strict and conscientious nonconformists, refused their consent. After a time he decided to become an Independent minister, and entered ...

Article

J. M. Rigg

revised by J. M. V. Quinn

Bayley, Robert Slater (1800/01–1859), Congregational minister, was educated at Highbury College, and took up his first pastorate at Louth, in Lincolnshire, concerning which place he published Notitiae Ludae, or, Notices of Louth in 1834. The following year he took charge of the Howard Street...

Article

Belden, Albert David (1883–1964), Congregational minister, was born on 17 February 1883 at 109 Great Dover Street, London, the son of William Belden (fl. 1850–1914), boot tree and last manufacturer, and his wife, Hester Evans. He was educated at Wilson's Grammar School, Camberwell...

Article

Belknap, Jeremy (1744–1798), Congregationalist minister in America and historian, was born on 4 June 1744 in Ann Street, Boston, Massachusetts, the eldest son of Joseph Belknap (d. 1797), a moderately prosperous leather dresser and furrier, and Sarah Byles. A fifth-generation New Englander on his father's side, ...

Article

Bennet, John (1715–1759), Methodist preacher and Independent minister, was born on 1 March 1715 in Whitehough, near Chinley, Derbyshire, the younger son of William Bennet (c.1677–1766), farmer, and his wife, Ann (d. 1752). Raised as a presbyterian, he was educated at a school in ...

Article

W. G. Blaikie

revised by R. Tudur Jones

Bennett, James (1774–1862), Congregational minister, was born in east London on 22 May 1774. His early education there he considered a waste of time and he was set to work with an overbearing tradesman. He moved to Bath and was converted there on 13 August 1792, under Methodist influence. He began to preach in the neighbourhood on 24 December 1792. On 17 October 1793 he entered the academy at ...

Image

William Henry Bennett (1855–1920) by James Russell & Sons, pubd 1907–9 © National Portrait Gallery, London