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Cutler, Ann (1759–1794), hand-loom weaver and Methodist evangelist, was born in Thornley, near Longridge, in the parish of Chipping, Lancashire; nothing is known of her parents. After living a strict, moral life she was converted in 1785 by the revivalist Wesleyan William Bramwell...

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Hampton, Elizabeth [Bess] (d. 1661), conventicle keeper and laundress, was perhaps of a family from Cuddesdon, Oxfordshire. She never married. She lived in Holywell Street, Oxford, round the corner from Wadham College, and on a direct route to Magdalen College, in a tenement leased from ...

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Rhodes [née Brittan], Elizabeth (1759–1836), housekeeper and Methodist leader, was born in Scotland, the daughter of Captain Brittan of the Queen's regiment of dragoons. In 1760 her father resigned his commission and moved to York, his wife's home town, but in 1765 he eloped with her maid. ...

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Shaw, Christian (b. c. 1685, d. in or after 1737), witch accuser and thread manufacturer, was the daughter of the laird of Bargarran, Renfrewshire, whose first name is unrecorded. According to a contemporary account (A True Narrative), when she was eleven years old she began to experience alarming symptoms, not only suffering mysterious fits, during which her body became as stiff as a board, her belly swelled, and her eyes rolled back into her head, but also vomiting balls of hair, pins, and hot embers. She had hallucinations too. The devil himself reportedly appeared before her and to the amazement of all beholders she engaged in complicated theological arguments with him, citing biblical texts with surprising accuracy. She also had lengthy discussions with a series of invisible tormentors whom she described as witches. They nipped and bit her, she said, pointing to the marks they had left. Questioned as to their identity, she named various local men and women, and this was to have catastrophic consequences....